Campus Event: Climate Change: What We Know, and What We Can Do

A free, day-long meeting about earth’s climate at Ohio Wesleyan, Saturday, March 31, 2018

Free: Please RSVP here for the event next weekend.

Looking forward to seeing you all there!  

Climate Change: What We Know, and What We Can Do

Saturday, 31 March 2018

2nd and 3rd Floors of Merrick Hall

Ohio Wesleyan University

Summary: The Anthropocene, the era in which humans have become the dominating factor to the global climate, is a period in the geologic history. For decades now, the public has heard of the phrases ‘global warming’ and ‘climate change.’ What continues to remain a challenge is the public’s understanding of the processes associated with the current global phenomenon. This workshop, supported by the Mellon Foundation, is an attempt to bring together climate scientists, industry, the public, and our academic institutions into one space to communicate what it means to be living in the Anthropocene. What do we know about it and what can we do about it? We seek to build long-term collaborations and help prepare a new generation of community members and scholars to address these concerns.

Preliminary Schedule

9:00-9:30         Check-in

9:30-9:45         Opening Remarks

9:45 – 11:15     Short Talks (with break)

11:15 – noon    Keynote Speaker: Dr. Christopher Karmosky, SUNY Oneonta

Noon – 1:00     Lunch

1:00 – 3:30       Workshops

3:30 – 4:00      Closing Remarks

We are looking for 1 – 2 persons to volunteer to be moderators of the short workshop groups (approximately 6). The idea here is for people to gather by interest and work on defining an agenda or outcome of the workshop. Moderators would be tasked with taking notes and making sure the group is on task. There will be modest financial compensation for moderators.

Please RSVP here ASAP. If you have any question, feel free to ask Dustin (dsbraden@owu.edu) or Nathan (nsamador@owu.edu).

OWU’s ‘Still In’ Paris Climate Agreement

President Rock Jones, Ph.D., signed the document June 5, making Ohio Wesleyan one of 183 colleges and universities to endorse the proclamation. “We Are Still In” also has been signed by representatives from 125 cities and nine states, and by 902 businesses and investors.

Source

University Among Those Supporting Paris Climate Agreement

There’s a familiar name among the 1,219 who signed the “We Are Still In” document in support of the Paris Agreement and its efforts to combat climate change.

President Rock Jones, Ph.D., signed the document June 5, making Ohio Wesleyan one of 183 colleges and universities to endorse the proclamation. “We Are Still In” also has been signed by representatives from 125 cities and nine states, and by 902 businesses and investors.

“It is imperative that the world know that in the U.S., the actors that will provide the leadership necessary to meet our Paris commitment are found in city halls, state capitals, colleges and universities, investors and businesses,” the document states. “Together, we will remain actively engaged with the international community as part of the global effort to hold warming to well below 2℃ and to accelerate the transition to a clean energy economy that will benefit our security, prosperity, and health.”

There are many reasons for Ohio Wesleyan to sign the document, Jones said. Perhaps most notable is the pioneering work of F. Sherwood Rowland, Ph.D., a 1948 OWU graduate.

A Delaware native, Rowland earned the 1995 Nobel Prize in chemistry for his work studying chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). His research led to significant discoveries in the field, including that chemicals in aerosol sprays, air conditioners and foam insulation were damaging the oxygen layer surrounding the earth’s atmosphere.

At a White House climate change roundtable in 1997, Rowland spoke passionately on behalf of scientists concerned about global warming: “Isn’t it a responsibility of scientists, if you believe that you have found something that can affect the environment, isn’t it your responsibility to do something about it, enough so that action actually takes place? If not us,” Rowland said, “who? If not now, when?”

Woodrow W. Clark II, Ph.D., a 1967 Ohio Wesleyan alumnus, also made an impact through his efforts to protect the environment as one of 30 members of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The IPCC was a co-recipient of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize, along with former U.S. Vice President Al Gore, for the film “An Inconvenient Truth.”

The spirit of “We Are Still In” also connects well with Ohio Wesleyan’s academic program and the April announcement that it was creating an Environment and Sustainability Program with a new environmental science major this fall, Jones said.

The Environment and Sustainability Program will include the collaboration of nearly 20 Ohio Wesleyan faculty members who specialize in the natural sciences, social sciences, arts, and humanities. One of the program’s highlights its innovative “Conversations: Toward a Sustainable Future” course. Students will take the course twice – once as newly declared environmental science majors and once as seniors in the program – to provide both a cornerstone and capstone for their study of ecological issues.

In addition, Jones said, Ohio Wesleyan’s signature Sagan National Colloquiumlecture series also has spent a semester examining global warming.

“In 2013, the entire campus focused attention on the ‘Interdisciplinary Impacts of Climate Change’ through the Sagan National Colloquium,” Jones said. “The Colloquium’s founding vision of connecting the liberal arts with civic arts – studying a topic and taking action in response to that study – is reflected in our signing of the ‘We Are Still In’ document.”

Learn more about the “We Are Still In” initiative at http://wearestillin.com.

Heart of Ohio March for Climate | Delaware, Ohio | Saturday April 29, 2017

Gathering people from everywhere in the heart of Ohio to call on Congress, our State and Local governments to take action on climate.

Heart of Ohio March for Climate

For Climate, Health and Jobs

Delaware, Ohio – Saturday April 29, 2017

Gather 9:45 – 10am at Bicentennial Park (next to Wilber Bills Fire Station)

March to Delaware County Courthouse (on sidewalks)

11:00am – Noon: Rally and program at the Courthouse

Gathering people from everywhere in the heart of Ohio to call on Congress, our State and Local governments to take action on climate.

This march is nonpartisan, open to those who are concerned about solving climate change. All are welcome. This march will be respectful of the elected officials and community leaders from across the political spectrum because these are people who are crucial in protecting the earth’s climate. We invite them to join us.

OWU Talk: Translocal Relations and Climate Change in East Asia: March 28

Why do local governments become actively engaged in the issue of global climate change? How do global factors influence local governments’ choices, policies, and interactions? These questions are puzzling in that local governments have been regarded as public service providers in the domestic arena; and studies on cities and climate change have primarily focused on domestic drivers to explain local governments’ climate change policies.

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Translocal Relations and Climate Change in East Asia

Tuesday, March 28 — 7:00 p.m. — Merrick Hall 301 Ohio Wesleyan University

Guest Lecturer: Taedong Lee

Why do local governments become actively engaged in the issue of global climate change? How do global factors influence local governments’ choices, policies, and interactions? These questions are puzzling in that local governments have been regarded as public service providers in the domestic arena; and studies on cities and climate change have primarily focused on domestic drivers to explain local governments’ climate change policies. In this talk, I discuss translocal relations of cities that have made an international effort to collectively tackle climate change. Compared to state-centric terms, inter-national or trans-national relations, trans-local relations look at policies, politics, and interactions of local governments in the globalized world. Using the framework of translocal relations, I argue that the level of global cityness and local political attributes are primary driving factors for local governments’ engagement in global climate governance in Asia as well as around the world.

Taedong Lee is associate professor at the Department of Political Science and International Relations at Yonsei University, Seoul. He received his Ph.D. at University of Washington, Seattle and was an assistant professor at the City University of Hong Kong from 2010 to 2013. His areas of research include global and sub-national environmental politics and policy, NGO politics, and social network analysis. Professor Lee recently published his book, Global Cities and Climate Change: Translocal Relations of Environmental Governance (Routledge, 2015). His articles have appeared in journals including Policy Sciences, Review of Policy Research, Journal of Cleaner Production, Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis, Policy Studies Journal, Energy Policy, and Global Environmental Politics.

Lecture is free and open to the public. Sponsored by the East Asian Studies Program, the Departments of Politics and Government and Sociology/ Anthropology, and the Office of the Provost.

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Climate Organizing Fellows

NextGen Climate is currently seeking detail oriented and highly motivated students to join our team in key states as stipend Fellows through the 2016 General Election.

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OHIO: Apply Here

SUMMARY: NextGen Climate is currently seeking detail oriented and highly motivated students to join our team in key states as stipend Fellows through the 2016 General Election. Fellows will be responsible for assisting Field Organizers managing volunteer efforts and voter registration/Get Out The Vote activities on key college campuses.

NextGen Climate is seeking Fellows who can begin immediately and work with NextGen Climate through the election in November 2016.

RESPONSIBILITIES:

  • Developing a volunteer base on target campuses
  • Effectively recruit volunteers around the 2016 election, climate change, and other political issues pertinent to young voters
  • Registering voters at on and off-campus events
  • Utilize social and earned media to recruit volunteers and promote events
  • Use voter database and online organizing tools
  • Responsible for voter contact, volunteer recruitment, and event management
  • Meet all goals and deadlines

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS AND ABILITIES REQUIRED:

  • Strong appetite for grassroots organizing and passionate about climate
  • Excellent organizational skills
  • Previous campaign experience is plus
  • Experience using voter databases like VAN is a plus
  • Ability to adapt rapidly to evolving priorities and deadlines
  • Driven with a strong work ethic
  • Act with high integrity and character
  • Self-motivated and willing to work long hours (including nights and weekends)
  • Previous climate, energy or environmental issue organizing experience a plus

COMPENSATION:

NextGen Climate offers stipended campaign organizing fellowships for students with both full-time and part time availability.

NextGen Climate is an equal opportunity employer.

ABOUT NEXTGEN CLIMATE:

NextGen Climate is a San Francisco-based environmental advocacy organization. Founded by businessperson and philanthropist Tom Steyer in 2013, we act politically to prevent climate disaster and promote prosperity for all Americans. Working at every level, we are committed to supporting candidates, elected officials, and policymakers across the country that will take bold action on climate change.

Apply Here