Dr. Anderson Receives NSF Funds for Online Field Ecology and Data Science

OWU’s Dr. Anderson, the second nicest professor on campus, has been awarded a NSF grant!


The National Science Foundation is awarding Ohio Wesleyan University a one-year, $86,735 grant to oversee the creation of online teaching tools that advance field ecology and data science.

Laurel J. Anderson, Ph.D., OWU’s Morris Family Professor of Natural Sciences, is the principal investigator on the federal grant. She also is president of the Board of Directors for the Ecological Research as Education Network (EREN), a consortium of colleges and universities that will work together to create the new teaching tools. Dr. Anderson will partner with Dr. Tim McCay from Colgate University to administer the project.

“The pandemic has created an urgent need to reimagine our teaching of field ecology, which is usually done with in-person field trips,” said Dr. Anderson, who helped to found EREN in 2010.

“However, field ecologists also use computer technology extensively to explore natural patterns at large scales,” she continued. “These projects allow us to meet our need to socially distance and have students collecting data wherever they happen to be. Then, we use online tools and datasets to see how their data fits into large-scale patterns.”

The National Science Foundation (NSF) grant will support four projects developed by teams of faculty-researchers at schools across the nation. The projects are:

  • Backyard Pollinator Surveys led by Dr. Kaitlin Stack Whitney at the Rochester Institute of Technology.
  • Plants in the Human-Altered Environment led by Drs. Jason Kilgore at Washington & Jefferson College and Karen Kuers at The University of the South.
  • Mosquito Surveys along Anthropogenic Impact Gradients led by Dr. Allison T. Parker at Northern Kentucky University.
  • Lichens in Diverse Landscapes led by Drs. Danielle Garneau at SUNY Plattsburgh, Matthew Heard at Belmont University, and Mary Beth Kolozsvary at Siena College.

The teaching tools being created will use data from the National Ecological Observatory Network(NEON) to show students how local data connects to ecological patterns at a continental scale.

NEON is a continental-scale ecological observation facility fully funded by the NSF and operated by Columbus, Ohio-based Battelle. NEON provides open data from 81 field sites nationwide to document how ecosystems are changing. The information is used to better understand how human activities affect ecology and how society can more effectively address critical ecological issues.

Source: OWU News & Media

!!!Virtual Earth Day Week ’20!!!

Please Distribute and Share!

Follow us for details on vEarth Day ’20
Let us know what you are doing:
comment below, or
#OWUENVS, or
@OWUENVS Twitter: https://twitter.com/owuenvs

EARTH WEEK CHALLENGES 

SUN 4/19  Welcome to Earth Week! Earth Day 1: To start participating, follow #OWUENVS on Twitter and post a photo of the Earth – where you are – on Twitter, or Instagram (#OWUENVS) or email to John K. Do your best to share the stuff you do for the rest of Earth Day Week (social media or otherwise)

MON 4/20 Earth Day 2: Together, let’s #StopTheSpread of pollution and #FlattenTheCurve on CO2 emissions. Go to FootPrintCalculator to find out how many Earths it would take to sustain your lifestyle for everyone, and how we can all take steps to scale back. Share your findings with us. Questions? Ask Kayla.

TUE 4/21 Earth Day 3: Since we can’t march tomorrow, make a sign (out of used paper bags or scrap paper) declaring your commitment to the planet and put it in your window for your neighbors to see for the rest of the week, or try experimenting with found art. Questions? Ask Aayla.

WED 4/22 Earth Day 4: It’s the 50th Anniversary of Earth Day! Join us on Zoom at 8 pm EST for a screening and discussion of Anote’s Ark, a film documenting the struggle of the island nation of Kiribati, one of the first to face being wiped off the map by rising seas. Details to follow. Questions? Ask Dustin.

THU 4/23 Earth Day 5: Take action. Use Citizen Climate Lobby’s calling tool and our Green Stimulus Talking Points to reach out to your lawmakers and tell them that the environment must be included in the next COVID-19 stimulus package to protect public health and the economy in the long term. Questions? Ask Celeste.

FRI 4/24 Earth Day 6: Happy Friday, treat yourself to a great meal! From 5:30-7 pm EST, join us on Zoom as Chef Del Sroufe teaches an interactive course on sustainable plant-based cooking, and learn how the food you eat affects the world you live in. More details to follow. Questions? Ask Genaro.

Happy vEarth Day! Earth Day! Week!

The Ohio Wesleyan Sustainability Task Force & the Environment & Sustainability Program. 

Organized by students in ENVS 399: Sustainability Practicum

#OWUENVS

In the overwhelming crush of media about the COVID 19 pandemic we don’t want to lose sight of the profound importance of the environment.

#OWUENVS is a collective effort to push environmental news and ideas and advocacy and creative efforts out through social media and other media by students, faculty, and staff in the Environment & Sustainability Program at Ohio Wesleyan University.

Find or create relevant stuff. Anything having to do with the environment anywhere. Links, ideas, videos, maps, photos, music, data, artwork, etc. Focus on the stuff you care about.

Put it out there: use the hashtag or tag #OWUENVS so we can track the effort. Focus on the media you use. On social media, video sites, music sites, whatever. Be creative.

Please let Meg Edwards or  John Krygier or Laurie Anderson know if you have any questions, ideas, or suggestions.

This effort is what we make it. It keeps us connected, and it matters.

 

 

Do Something! OWU Volunteers Needed for Spring Cleaning & Planting

Last year President Trump and President Macron of France planted a lovely oak tree on the White House lawn. Sadly, the tree is now dead.

Let’s do better!

Tree planting and spring clean up opportunities abound. No big commitment. Please sign up soon and often:

A Scioto River Clean-up March 15th organized by a Buckeye Valley H.S. Student: Register here

OWA’s Earth Day Program April 4th at Delaware State Park: Register here

Blue Limestone Park Stream Clean-up from 4:30-5:30, April 15th: (weather back-up date is scheduled for April 16th same time and place) registration can be completed by emailing Caroline Cicerchi (here).

City of Delaware’s Earth Day Program April 22nd: Register here

The Scioto River if we didn’t do the river clean up every year:

 

 

Talk: Cria Kay on Environmental Work: Friday Feb. 28 @ noon

The Environment & Sustainability Program is very pleased to invite students to a pizza lunch with Cria Kay at 12-1 PM, Friday, February 28, 2020, in Science Center Room 207.

Cria has a Masters of Science in Environmental Informatics and Environmental Justice from the University of Michigan School for Environment and Sustainability and a Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Studies, Comparative American Studies, and Geology from Oberlin College. She is now working at the Lincoln Park Zoo in Chicago as the coordinator for the growing Urban Wildlife Information Network.

Cria will give a short presentation titled “Urban Studies and Environmental Work: Water and Wildlife” and then will answer student questions about graduate school and careers focused on the environment.

To learn more about Cria, go here.

OWU Talk: The Beaver Hypothesis: Bluebirding Before the Seventeenth Century

SCIENCE LECTURE SERIES

Thursday, February 6 at 4:10 p.m.
Science Center 163

Richard Tuttle
Citizen Scientist & Former Middle School Biology Teacher

“The Beaver Hypothesis: Bluebirding Before the Seventeenth Century”

Dick Tuttle is a retired middle school life science teacher and lifelong conservationist with a particular interest in cavity nesting songbirds. Over the past 50 years, Dick has raised more than 55,000 native birds from 10 different species! In this seminar, he will discuss how birds were able to find suitable cavities for nesting before humans began building bird boxes and placing them in their backyards. Specifically, he will investigate the role of beavers as engineers of suitable nesting habitat and describe the effects of early fur traders on populations of beavers and songbirds. He will conclude by linking all of these ideas to modern conservation efforts by arguing that sometimes to move forward you need to look backward.

 

OWU Talk: “It’s Getting Hot In Here: Assessing Greenland’s Melt Behavior Driven by Wind Events”

SCIENCE LECTURE SERIES

Thursday, January 30 at 4:10 p.m.
Science Center 163

Dr. Nathan Amador Rowley
Assistant Professor of Geology & Geography, Ohio Wesleyan University

“It’s Getting Hot In Here: Assessing Greenland’s Melt Behavior Driven by Wind Events”

Over the past few decades, the acceleration of meltwater production along the periphery of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) is driving the observed increase in global sea level. During the summer months, surface meltwater is driven by air temperature above the melting point and solar radiation receipt at the surface – melting accumulated wintertime snow. The orographic nature of the GrIS has shown to significantly influence wind patterns at automated weather stations in the melt zone, near the fast-flowing Sermeq Kujalleq (formerly known as Jakobshavn Isbræ) Glacier. I have identified a particular set of synoptic conditions, known as piteraq events, that are surface winds that bring adiabatically-warmed air from the interior of the ice sheet. Piteraq winds, through compressional heating, warm the ablation (or melt) zone and thus enhance melt; beyond what would be done by solar radiation alone. Commonly mislabeled as katabatic winds, piteraq winds resemble the Föhn winds of the Alps, or Chinook winds of the Rockies. During the 2011 and 2012 summer months, a series of piteraq events in the Sermeq Kujalleq Ablation Region, or SKAR, lead surface temperature at nearby weather stations to be nearly 2°C higher than the 1980-2010 mean.

 

Speaker: Ryan Zlatanova OWU ’17: Environment & Sustainability: Campus to Career (W, Nov. 6)

Wednesday, November 6
12 p.m. Science Center 207

Ryan holds a degree in Zoology and is a dedicated conservationist. Currently, he works in Activism and Outreach at the World Wildlife Fund, one of the biggest conservation non-profits in the world. During his time at OWU, Ryan engaged in various campus sustainability efforts that shaped his career path.

Live link conversation, using fancy technology.

All are invited.

Part of ENVS 100.2/400.1 Conversations Towards a Sustainable Future.

Promo poster below: